Tag Archives: dog

Training Meister Journeyman – The Comprehensive Dog Training Course. Presented by Louise Stapleton-Frappell

Presented by Louise Stapleton-Frappell

CEUs PPAB,15. IAABC,15. CCPDT, 10.

TrainingMeister_Journeyman

Training Meister Journeyman Course

A five session programme

to work through over 5 months. 

Training Meister – Mastering Fun and Increasing Your Team Knowledge & Skills is a unique programme aimed at increasing the knowledge and training skills of both dog guardians and pet professionals. The aim of the Training Meister courses is to teach the science behind the training as well as all the skills needed to train a pet dog, with a big emphasis on enjoyment.  We firmly believe that all training should be fun but knowledge based.  We also believe in setting the learner up for success.  This applies both to our human learners and their canine buddies!

Journeyman Course Overview

Journeyman is the Level Two Training Meister course.  This course builds on all the skills and knowledge gained in the Apprentice course. The Journeyman course sees you continue your journey on the road to becoming a Master in the art and craft of force-free training and tricks! 

You will continue to learn about the science behind the training and build on your teaching skills, while having lots of fun!  You will refine your ability to communicate with your learner in order to set them up for success and as you continue to increase your knowledge and add to your skill-set, you will be amazed at the progression made by both you and your dog or other companion animal.

The knowledge and skills you learn in Training Meister Journeyman will set you up for all your future training.  As you practice the behaviors that you learn, your student will acquire new skills, continue to thrive and gain confidence.  Your relationship will further blossom and your bond will strengthen.

You do not need to have taken the Training Meister Apprentice Course, to enroll in the Training Meister Journeyman Course, however, it is advisable to check the learning objectives and assessment criteria from the Apprentice Level to ensure that you have the foundation knowledge for this course.

Programme Inclusion

  • Five recorded webinar e-learning sessions per level.
  • PDF of all webinars
  • Additional learning:  Additional reading material and supplementary videos
  • Homework tasks
  • Open book/multiple choice exams. 
  • Video submission assessment.  .
  • Training Meister Course Facebook group .
  • Video submission assessment to earn the TrickMeister Journeyman Trick Team Title! Please note, you must have earned the Apprentice Title in order to submit your application for the Journeyman Title.

 

The course aims to encourage both guardians and trainers to develop new skills and increase their knowledge while having the best time possible.  You’ll never have more fun learning than when taking this exciting course!

For more information, please visit: http://dognosticselearning.com/Trainingmeister

Journeyman Course Testimonials

“I hope you saw my post thanking you for your help and encouragement. I also want to thank you for being the creator of such a WONDERFUL course. I had taken two other trick titling courses and in comparison, now I feel like I just bought the titles. There was no testing and no education as in your course. I feel your course is the GOLD standard by which I will measure all other training courses!! Thanks again for a wonderful job developing the course and all the hours you must invest in keeping the course running.”  Terri Latronica. Dog Trainer at Boyette Animal Hospital. Florida

“I have really enjoyed the DogNostics TrickMeister Journeyman Course presented by Louise Stapleton-Frappell.  This class goes beyond just showing you how to train a certain trick, but divulges into the science behind the force free training.  The how and why it works so well; how it opens the door to communicate with the learner, thus, setting them up for success.Collie with computer

I have learned a great deal from Louise by her wonderful monthly webinars.  Each month was new tricks and a different aspect of the science behind the teaching of these tricks.  I highly recommend this class to anyone wanting a stronger and more meaningful relationship with their furry companion.  Louise is a wonderful, encouraging person and a very well informed instructor.  You can’t help but to absolutely love her demo dog, Jumbo.  I have enjoyed teaching my dog tricks that I never thought I was capable of doing.  Force free training has opened up a whole new world for me and my dogs.  They love learning and I love to teach.  I am looking forward to the next class and an even deeper understanding of force free training.”  Patti Howerton, Illinois.

“I thoroughly enjoyed the Journeyman course and have learnt so much.  The information here is second to none and needs careful understanding, so all the extra links and opportunity to watch the webinars time again is invaluable.  As an older student it has helped me greatly to watch, read, listen and actually apply what I have learnt in my training and also watch and share progress with the Facebook group.  This has been a lovely way to enrich the relationship I share with my dogs.  Thank you!.”  Lizzie Morris, Devon.

 

Begin your Training Meister journey today!

Toads, Snakes, Spiders and Chocolate!

Toads, Snakes, Spiders and Chocolate!  Written for The Pet Professional Guild blog on November 5, 2016 by Louise Stapleton-Frappell

Did you know that an encounter with a toad could have devastating consequences? During a recent class I was teaching, one of the students said that her training buddy and his friends had found a large toad in their yard. They were very fortunate as none of them made actual contact with the toad. Two years ago, I posted a blog, How Force-Free Training Helped Save My Dog’s Life! in which I told the story of my Staffordshire bull terrier, Jambo’s encounter with a toad in the middle of the night and how a combination of previous training, first aid and an immediate visit to the emergency veterinarian all contributed to saving his life. I’m not going to re-visit the story here but I would definitely recommend reading the blog post.
Jambo was fortunate. His training and my first-aid knowledge both contributed to a happy outcome.

Jambo was fortunate. His training and my first-aid knowledge both contributed to a happy outcome

What I would like to do is share some information about toads and a few other creatures, food items, products and objects that could prove deadly to your companion. Let’s start with a few facts about the Common Toad (Bufo Bufo). Toads range in size from 2 – 25 cm (1 – 10 inches). Toads are poisonous when eaten but even mouthing one can prove extremely dangerous. The poison is located in the raised area behind the eyes, known as the parotid gland. Poison is also present in the warts found on the toad’s skin. The toad secretes poison when it feels threatened. Toads are nocturnal creatures, that live on land but breed in water. The toad will often burrow itself underground and remain there for long periods of time, particularly during droughts or very cold weather. They are more likely to be seen at night and in wet weather conditions. There are many different species of toad and, depending on where you live, varied outcomes of coming into close contact with them. The native British toad, Bufus vulgarisis is, for example, much less toxic than some exotic species, such as Bufus blombergi, Bufus alvarius, Bufus marinus.

What are some of the signs that indicate an encounter with a toad? They might vary from less severe local oral effects to inflammation of the mouth and pharynx with excessive salivation and retching, abdominal pain, vomiting, neurological and cardiovascular effects. Contact with exotic toads is more likely to cause the more severe systemic effects and these may be fatal. A dog may show some or all of the following symptoms: Drooling, head shaking, pawing at the mouth and/or whining. There may be a change in the color of the membranes of the mouth. Your dog may attempt to vomit, actively vomit or have diarrhoea. They may experience loss of coordination, an irregular heartbeat and/or difficulty in breathing. They may have convulsions, foam at mouth and/or tightly clamped jaws. The venom can cause rapid heart failure.

Patients that have been treated before enough of the toxin has had a chance to reach the system, within about thirty minutes, usually have a good chance of recovery. However, the overall prognosis is often not good and death is very common in dogs that have been exposed to toad venom. It is vital to get prompt treatment for your dog. Try to be at your veterinary surgery within fifteen minutes as this can make a life-saving difference. Treatment is symptomatic and may vary, dependent on your vet and the severity of the symptoms.

What should you do if you suspect toad poisoning? Contact your emergency vet immediately and follow their advice. While you are doing so, apply immediate first-aid. My advice, reiterated by my own veterinarian, is to rinse out the dog’s mouth with copious amounts of water for at least five minutes. You do NOT want them to swallow it so I suggest the following protocol: Fill a bowl with water; with one hand, hold your dog’s mouth open with head facing downwards; scoop up water from the water bowl with your other hand and rinse out his/her mouth, letting the water come back out onto the floor (not into the bowl). If your dog is having a seizure, please handle with caution as he/she may not recognize you and could unknowingly bite. Keep your pet cool as they can overheat when convulsing. My advice is not intended to replace your veterinarian’s advice, so please act according to their instructions but I do believe that having a knowledge of first-aid procedures can make a huge difference in the way you are likely to react to a potentially fatal situation.

Everyone should have basic first-aid skills. PresenterMedia 1641
Everyone should have basic first-aid skills. PresenterMedia 1641

Please be aware that toad toxin exposure can cause severe irritation to your eyes, nose and throat. If you need to handle the toad, I recommend the use of rubber gloves.

A few more creatures and other items that may be toxic to your dog:
Venomous snakes. Three factors affect the seriousness of a snake bite: 1. The size of the animal bitten. 2. The location of the bite. 3. The type of snake. If your pet is bitten by a snake please seek immediate veterinary attention as they may require antiserum. Try to remember the shape, size and colour of the snake and keep the part of your pet’s body that has been bitten as still as possible to prevent the venom spreading.
Spiders.
Jelly fish.
Scorpions.
Processionary caterpillars.
Chocolate. (The darker, the more toxic)
Onions.
Raisins, grapes, currants and sultanas.
Flowers and plants. Including but not limited to: daffodils, bluebells, crocuses, tulips, ivy, holly, mistletoe and poinsettia. It’s always worth investigating any plants you may have in your garden or plan to purchase.
Oak/acorns and conkers.
Xylitol – an artificial sweetener commonly found in sugar-free chewing gum, sweets, some peanut butter spreads and often used as a sugar substitute in baking.
Ant powders, baits and gels; slug and snail pellets; anticoagulant rodenticides.
Luminous necklaces.
Batteries.
Antifreeze.
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as paracetamol, ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen or aspirin.

This list is by no means exhaustive. If you are in any way concerned that your dog may have been poisoned, had an encounter with anything toxic or venomous, please contact your emergency veterinarian immediately.

What precautions can you take to help protect your canine companion?

1. Use force-free training techniques to teach your dog the following cues:
“Leave it”. Teaching your dog to leave something when you ask him to could save his life. When using food to teach this cue, do not reward with the food you have asked him to leave. Pick the food up off the floor and reward with a higher value food. You do not want your dog to start anticipating that you are going to release him to the very thing you just asked him to leave!
“Come”. Teach your dog a great recall! Never use your recall cue if you don’t think your dog will respond – go and get him instead. Never punish your dog for not coming back to you, as he will be less likely to come back in future.
“Watch Me”. Teaching your dog to focus on you could be all you need to get him to re-orient towards you, rather than the snake, toad or anything else you want him to avoid making contact with.
“Stop!”. Teach your dog an emergency stop. Once you have taught your dog to stop on cue, increase the level of urgency in your voice. Remember, if you use the cue in an emergency you may shout or even scream it. You don’t want your dog to be so frightened of you shouting “stop” that they freeze or run away (perhaps straight into what you are trying to get them to avoid) so a positive conditioned emotional response is crucial.
A rapid response to any of these cues could prevent an encounter that might be extremely dangerous for your dog! If you would like to improve your training knowledge and skills, I highly recommend the DogNostics Training Meister Program. You can register for the first level here.

Training Meister – Increasing your team knowledge and skills
Training Meister – Increasing your team knowledge and skills

2. It can be useful to carry an anti-histamine such as zyrtec or piriton.

3. Enroll on a pet first-aid course. The upcoming Pet Care Technician Certification Program from DogNostics Career College includes a comprehensive pet first-aid section.

4. Always have your veterinarian’s telephone number with you.

5. Try not to panic.

Please note: This advice is not a substitute for a proper consultation with a vet and is only intended as a guide. Please contact your local veterinary practice for advice or treatment immediately if you are worried about your pet’s health – even if they are closed, they will always have an out of hours service available.