Dog Training – Learning & Credentials

Louise Stapleton-Frappell B.A. Hons. PCT-A. CAP3. CTDI. DN-FSG1. DN-CPCT2 Wow that’s a lot of letters and I recently added some more: PCBC-A! (Professional Canine Behavior Consultant – Accredited).

So why do I feel the need to continuously further my education in the field of force-free, rewards based, science based dog training?

I am sure that many of you are already aware that the field of dog training is as yet an unregulated industry. Whether you live in the USA, the UK or elsewhere, you will probably be surrounded by people calling themselves dog trainers and offering pet dog classes.  Some of these individuals will have worked hard to continuously improve their skills and expand their knowledge in the field of rewards based, science based, force-free dog training. Unfortunately, there will be many more who have set up shop and are using techniques that are not only outdated but also potentially emotionally and physically harmful to the pets in their care.

I grew up surrounded by beautiful countryside and lots of animals. Border Collies, German Shepherd Dogs and Chow Chows were part of the family home.  After studying for my Bachelor of Arts Honours Degree at the University of Leeds, I took my first teaching post at a school in Cartagena. This was soon followed by a move to Southern Spain where I added a beautiful German Shepherd x Doberman, Bess, to my family and thus began my passion for teaching dogs as well as people!

Samson and Bess in 1999

When I first started training Bess, ‘going to school’ wasn’t something dog trainers did.  Most dog trainers were self-taught or carried out apprenticeships with those already working in the field.  At that point in time, I had no intention of training professionally but I did want to train effectively and with my dog’s best interests at heart.

Tessa and Samson

I was very fortunate as a local veterinarian put me in touch with a respected police dog trainer who passed on his knowledge and shared his love of the beautiful canines he worked with. The dogs were taught with enthusiasm, praise and lots of games. Manolo’s most repeated words to me at that time were “más, más!…  She worked hard, reward her more, play more!”  Bess loved to jump and so that is exactly what we encouraged her to do.  She would happily fly up into the air to the sound of my jubilant ‘yay’!  I didn’t know it then, but what we were doing was positively reinforcing the behaviour she had just carried out.

Jambo & Tessa with an Edition of BARKS from the Guild Magazine (April 2016`0

A gorgeous Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Samson, was soon added to my family and he was followed by my present family members, Tessa and Jambo. I continued to follow my love of teaching dogs and furthered my education in the world of dog training.  I discovered the world of dog tricks and shared my passion with Jambo, who, at the age of just 16 months, became the first Staffordshire Bull Terrier to become a Trick Dog Champion. Jambo has since been aired on Talent Hounds TV in Canada and was also featured as a Victoria Stilwell Positively Story.

Manolo sadly passed away at a young age but I am sure that if he were with us today, he would have helped lead the way in promoting force-free training. I have been very fortunate as, unlike when Manolo was training, there are now many great educational courses and resources available that have allowed me to continue to build on my knowledge and further my education.

I believe that if you wish to do your best by those in your care, it is your obligation to make sure that the knowledge and skills you are sharing are based on the most up-to-date information available.  We know so much more now about the way animals learn. We know so much more about how our interactions with them affect both their mental and physical wellbeing.   There is no longer anything standing in our paths. We can find and attend courses; read up on the latest scientific findings; learn about operant and respondent conditioning; watch amazing instructional videos and webinars from some of the top people in our field who willingly spend their time creating informative, fun-filled educational presentations; we can attend workshops and seminars; we can follow the amazing studies into canine cognition; read books written by the ‘rock stars’ of our industry: Jean Donaldson, Pat Miller, James O’Hare, Ken Ramirez, Kay Laurence, Karen Pryor, Niki Tudge, Patricia McConnell. Victoria Stilwell, Denise Fenzi, Bob Bailey and many more.

I’m not saying that every dog trainer or pet industry professional needs to earn every credential there is, but I don’t believe there is any excuse for using out-dated punitive methods based on myths and old-wives tales about being the pack leader.  Furthering your education does not just give you a scientific grounding to your work, it also helps to elevate you to a professional level in a field that is unfortunately still awash with amateurs.

I started by saying ‘Wow, that’s a lot of letters’, so I will now explain what some of them mean.  I’m a Certified Trick Dog Instructor and a DogNostics Fun Scent Games Instructor; I gained my CAP3 with Distinction – That’s the clicker training Competency Assessment Programme from Learning About Dogs; I’m a DogNostics Level 2 Pet Care Technician and I have verified certification in Animal Behaviour and Welfare (Edinburgh University) and Dog Emotion and Cognition (Duke University). I was one of the first twenty people worldwide to become a Professional Canine Trainer – Accredited, through the Pet Professional Accreditation Board and, as I previously mentioned, I am now a Professional Canine Behavior Consultant.

The Pet Professional Accreditation Board – PPAB – offers the only Accredited Training Technician and Professional Canine Trainer certification for professionals who believe there is no place for shock, choke, prong, fear or intimidation in canine training and behavior practices.  PPAB also offers the only psychometrically developed examination for Training & Behavior Consultants who also support these humane and scientific practices.

Professional Canine Behavior Consultant –  A definition:

Dictionaries define the word Consultant in several ways.  PPAB defines a Consultant as a professional who undertakes consultations and focuses primarily on modifying behavior problems that are elicited by emotions. Consultants are also professional dog trainers that can competently teach obedience classes, day training, private training sessions, board and train programs that focus on pet dog skills and manners.  Consultants are behavior and training professionals skilled in the application of science and artistic endeavor who delivers results through the development of mutually respectful, caring relationships – Pet Professional Acceditation Board

I for one will continue to study as I know that there is still so much to learn! You can learn more about PPAB here

 
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The Hierarchy of Rewards is Not Static

In 2014, I published a blog post entitled Jambo’s Hierarchy of Rewards in which I discussed the different reinforcers I use when training and the ‘value’ they have for my learner.  In my article entitled Rewards and Positive Reinforcement – Are they the same?  I discussed the meaning of rewards versus reinforcement. In this article I would like to take a look at “hierarchies”.

When needs are not being met, animals will be motivated to try and fulfil those needs.  Psychologist Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a motivational theory in psychology comprising a five-tier model of human needs, often depicted as hierarchical levels within a pyramid. Maslow stated that people are motivated to achieve certain needs and that some needs take precedence over others. Our most basic need is for physical survival, and this will be the first thing that motivates our behavior. Once that level is fulfilled the next level up is what motivates us. The original hierarchy of needs five-stage model includes:

  1. Biological and physiological needs – air, food, drink, shelter, warmth, sex, sleep. The things that we need to survive. All animals are motivated by these needs. If we are hungry we will want to eat, if we are thirsty, we will want to drink.
  2. Safety needs – protection from elements, security, order, law, stability, freedom from fear. Not having these needs met can lead to stress and anxiety and even to aggressive responses in an effort to protect ourselves
  3. Love and belongingness needs – friendship, intimacy, trust and acceptance, receiving and giving affection and love. Affiliating, being part of a group (family, friends, work). The need for us to communicate with others and interact with others. If this need isn’t met we can become depressed and anxious. The same is true of animals.
  4. Esteem needs – which Maslow classified into two categories: (i) esteem for oneself (dignity, achievement, mastery, independence) and (ii) the desire for reputation or respect from others (e.g. status, prestige).
  5. Self-actualization needs – realizing personal potential, self-fulfillment, seeking personal growth and peak experiences.

It is important to note that Maslow’s (1943, 1954) five stage model has been expanded to include cognitive and aesthetic needs (Maslow, 1970a) and later transcendence needs (Maslow, 1970b) as follows:

  1. Biological and physiological needs
  2. Safety needs
  3. Love and belongingness needs
  4. Esteem needs
  5. Cognitive needs – knowledge and understanding, curiosity, exploration, need for meaning and predictability. The need to understand and a desire to know things.
  6. Aesthetic needs – appreciation and search for beauty, balance, form, etc.
  7. Self-actualization needs
  8. Transcendence needs – A person is motivated by values which transcend beyond the personal self. e.g. mystical experiences and certain experiences with nature, aesthetic experiences, sexual experiences, service to others, the pursuit of science, a religious faith etc. (McLeod, 2017)

Why is Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory important?  It has made a big impact on how we teach and manage our students in school. We know that behavior is a response to the environment but Maslow’s hierarchy also looks at the physical, emotional, social and intellectual needs and how they impact learning. The hierarchy also clearly shows us that before an individual’s cognitive needs can be met, we must fulfil the basic physiological needs. I often tell my clients that although we want to use food as reinforcement that does not mean that I want anyone to not feed their dog.  A hungry learner will find it very difficult to focus on learning!  I also believe we should show our learners, both human and canine, that they are valued and respected and ensure we work with them in a safe and supportive environment.  We need to meet the esteem needs of all our students so that they can quickly progress with their learning!

The Hierarchy of Dog Needs adapted from Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs by Pet Professional Guild member, Linda Michaels, is a hierarchical model of wellness and behavior modification in which first we meet our dogs’ biological, emotional and social needs and, once these foundational needs have been met, we use management, antecedent modification, positive and differential reinforcement, counter-conditioning and desensitization to modify behavior.

Although not a hierarchy, before I get back to my Hierarchy of Rewards, I would like to mention Brambell’s Five Freedoms, which put responsibility on the animal care taker to make sure they provide animals with a good welfare environment.  I learned about the Five Freedoms and other animal welfare frameworks as part of my Animal Behaviour and Welfare course, University of Edinburgh.

In 1965, the UK government commissioned an investigation, led by Professor Roger Brambell, into the welfare of intensively farmed animals. The Brambell Report stated that:  “An animal should at least have sufficient freedom of movement to be able without difficulty, to turn round, groom Itself, get up, lie down and stretch its limbs”. This short recommendation became known as Brambell’s Five Freedoms. Because of the report, the Farm Animal Welfare Advisory Committee was created to monitor the livestock production sector. In July 1979, this was replaced by the Farm Animal Welfare Council, and by the end of that year, the five freedoms had been codified into the recognizable list format. Although developed for farm animals, Brambell’s Five Freedoms can be adapted to pets. The Five Freedoms are:

  • Freedom from Hunger and Thirst
    By ready access to fresh water and diet to maintain health and vigor.
  • Freedom from Discomfort
    By providing an appropriate environment including shelter and a comfortable resting area.
  • Freedom from Pain, Injury or Disease
    By prevention or rapid diagnosis and treatment.
  • Freedom to Display Natural Behavior
    By providing sufficient space, proper facilities and company of the animal’s own kind.
  • Freedom from Fear and Distress
    By ensuring conditions and treatment which avoid mental suffering.

In addition to Brambell’s Five Freedoms other animal welfare frameworks such as the Duty of Care Concept need to be foremost in our minds when caring for and working with any animal. The Duty of Care Concept focuses on providing animals with a safe happy environment which they can enjoy and encourages legal responsibility for those animals.

Now back to Jambo’s Hierarchy of Rewards (Stapleton-Frappell, 2013)  If you have read everything above, you will understand that before beginning any training, the trainer should make sure that the learner’s basic needs are met. The trainer can then make use of both primary and secondary reinforcers but must bear in mind that the ‘value’ will be ascertained by the recipient and not the provider as, although I use the name Hierarchy of Rewards, I am referring to a hierarchy of positive reinforcement consequences.

The ‘value’ will be ascertained by the recipient and not the provider

Whether teaching Jambo or any other learner a new behavior, or reinforcing behaviors that have previously been taught, I use that learner’s own personal ‘hierarchy of rewards’.  Each individual’s hierarchy includes lower ‘value’ reinforcers which are consequence stimuli that will serve to reinforce simple known behaviors in that individual’s home environment or other non-distracting environments; medium ‘value’ reinforcers which will serve to reinforce slightly more difficult behaviors or behaviors in slightly more demanding environments, and finally, high ‘value’ reinforcers – those reinforcers that are at the ‘top of the tree’, the real ‘top guns’  that we use to reinforce more demanding behaviors and behaviors in environments where there are a lot of competing stimuli.

My go-to reinforcer when teaching a new behavior or when I need lots of repetitions is always food – small pieces of tasty, easy to chew and easy to swallow food – as I can deliver it quickly and maintain a high rate of reinforcement. It is also more effective to use smaller reinforcements more frequently rather than large reinforcements less often. However, I also make good use of ‘non-food’ items, which include everything from balls to tug toys to life rewards –  access to things my learner wants, such as going outside, sniffing a patch of grass, greeting someone…  Whether using food or non-food reinforcers, primary or secondary reinforcers, one thing is certain – reinforcers are not all equal and the ‘value’ of an individual reinforcer is not static. The ‘value’ to the learner will change depending on such factors as:

  • The behavior itself – The behaviors, as determined by the animal’s ability to do them and its biological pre-disposition to behave in certain ways, are easier or more difficult to reinforce. Behavior that depends on smooth muscles and glands is harder to reinforce than is behavior that depends on skeletal muscles. (Chance, Learning and Behavior, 2013)
  • The individual’s preferences
  • Previous learning history
  • The Setting Events and Motivating Operations

There are variables affecting reinforcement and affecting the value of each reinforcer at any given time, in different environments and with different individuals.  We also need to bear in mind that If we use the higher ‘value’ reinforcers too frequently for easy behaviors in non-distracting environments, we could find that not only will our learner no longer be motivated to ‘work’ for lower value reinforcers, but also that we dilute the value of those reinforcers that were previously at the top of the Hierarchy, making them less effective in more demanding situations or with more demanding behaviors.  We should make sure that we have a variety of reinforcers on all levels of our learner’s Hierarchy so that we have something to call upon of appropriate value in all situations. Varying the reinforcement consequence that is offered, will also help to overcome satiation – at some point, we have all eaten enough of that delicious cake but that doesn’t mean that we would say no to an ice-cold bottle of beer!

Although each individual will have their own Hierarchy of Rewards, neither Jambo nor any other learner’s Hierarchy of Rewards is static.  What works as a reinforcer one day may be of little interest to the same learner the next day.

The Hierarchy of Rewards

If Jambo were reasonably hungry and we were working in a non-distracting environment, he would probably find kibble (dry dog food) to be of sufficient ‘value’ and it would serve as an adequate reinforcement consequence.  If, however, we were to try and do that same behavior in a more distracting environment, at a greater distance or perhaps when Jambo had just eaten, then the kibble would have very little, if any ‘value’ and would not serve to positively reinforce a behavior.  If Jambo were in a playful mood then his tug toy would have a much higher value than if he were tired and ready for bed. An opportunity to sniff a nice patch of grass might serve to reinforce the behavior of coming close to me on a nice summer’s evening but on a dark and wet winter’s night, the opposite would be true –  If I wanted Jambo to leave my side and go to the grass, then it might be returning to my side and the protection of my umbrella that would serve as a reinforcer but maybe even that would not be of high enough ‘value’ and he would simply decide not to carry out the behavior. Perhaps performing ‘send-aways’ in the rain, calls for roast chicken?

This is the second in a series of three posts from my article: “The Hierarchy of Rewards – Delving into the World of Positive Reinforcers” for BARKS from the Guild magazine.  Part one can be found here:  Rewards and Positive Reinforcement – Are they the same?  In part three we will take a closer look at motivating operations; Jambo’s personal Hierarchy of Rewards, and some of the primary and secondary reinforcers we can all make use of in our training

This article has also been published as a DogSmith blog and through DogNostics Career Center with the title: A Dog’s Hierarchy of Rewards

Rewards and Reinforcement – Are they the same?

The language we use when discussing our training methods can sometimes be slightly misleading.  Much discussion is given to the use of terms such as force-free, rewards based and positive reinforcement.  Sometimes there will be shared-meaning and at other times, these terms will be used and attributed to diametrically opposed training methods.  The words ‘reward’ and ‘positive reinforcement’ are often used to describe the same process but are they really the same?

Let’s begin with a definition of reinforcement and a few other terms you are likely to come across when reading about rewards based, science based, force-free training. The term to reinforce means to strengthen and it is used in behavioral psychology to refer to a stimulus which strengthens or increases the probability of a specific response.  Behavior is the function of its consequences and reinforcement strengthens the likelihood of a behavior.  To qualify as reinforcement an experience must have three characteristics:  First, the behavior must have a consequence.  Second, the behavior must increase in strength (e.g. occur more often).  Third, the increase in strength must be a result of the consequence (Chance, 2013 )

When comparing rewards to reinforcement, I am referring to one of the quadrants of operant conditioning:  positive reinforcement. Positive means that a stimulus is added. With positive reinforcement, a behavior is followed by a stimulus (which the subject seeks out/will work to receive) which reinforces the behavior that precedes it, resulting in an increase in the frequency, intensity and/or duration of that behavior. To clarify, a reinforcer is a stimulus that, when it occurs in conjunction with a behavior and is contingent on that behavior, it makes that behavior occur more often. But what if the behavior doesn’t increase in frequency, strength or duration? What if the behavior continues to occur with the same frequency or occurs less often?  In this case, we can reliably say that the consequence stimulus would not qualify as reinforcement.

Is a reward the same as a reinforcer?  The simple answer is no, it is not.  Although, when simplifying our language, it is often useful to advise our clients to mark and reward (click and treat/mark and pay), a reward and a reinforcer/reinforcement consequence are not the same. Let’s look at the definition of a reward:

  • A thing given in recognition of service, effort, or achievement
  • A sum offered for information leading to the solving of a crime, the detection of a criminal, etc. (Oxford University Press, 2017)

The key here is in the definition. I may be given something in recognition of my hard work but that does not necessarily mean that I will work harder in the future.  If my reward for all the extra hours I worked were a simple thank you – would that act as reinforcement?  What about if my reward for all the hours I worked were a big cash bonus – would that serve as a reinforcement consequence?

A Reward – A thing given in recognition of service, effort, or achievement.

A reward may or may not positively reinforce a behavior. There are a few reasons why, one being that the giver of the reward is who decides what to give and denotes it as a reward.  The recipient might not be quite so enthusiastic about the perceived reward.  Jambo (my Staffordshire Bull Terrier) and I were once rewarded with a ‘beautiful’ trophy for taking first place in an event at a local competition.  The trophy went on to take pride of place hidden away in a cupboard!  Did the trophy act as a reinforcer?  As a result of that consequence (being rewarded with a trophy), did Jambo and I enter more competitions/try to win more competitions?  No. The reward was only ‘beautiful’ in the eye of the giver. The recipient of the reward thought otherwise, hence its ubication – hiding out in the back of a cupboard!

Rewards often come with some sort of judgement on the person or animal they are directed at whereas reinforcers are linked to the behavior not the giver nor the recipient.  Just like rewards, reinforcers can be delivered by people but they can also be delivered by the environment. Suppose for example that one morning your dog manages to slip out of the door and chase the neighbor’s cat. The dog has a wonderful time and the next morning flies out of the door as soon as it is opened.  That one act of joyfully chasing the neighbor’s cat has effectively reinforced rushing out of the door as soon as it is opened! If the neighbor’s cat never ventures into your yard again, the behavior may undergo extinction but this is unlikely as the act of running at full speed out of the door and across the yard is undoubtedly self-reinforcing – offering intrinsic reinforcement and serving as wonderful motivation!  What if the behavior is put on a variable schedule of reinforcement i.e. the cat is occasionally available to be chased?  You can probably guess the answer. The behavior of rushing out of the door will go from strength to strength as it is being extrinsically reinforced in the same way as playing on a slot-machine is – you know that if you keep playing, you are sure to win again at some point!

Now, just because I have clarified that rewards and positive reinforcement consequences are not the same, that does not mean I am never going to tell people to reward their dog.  I also tell people to pay their dog.  That doesn’t mean I want my clients to throw a wad of cash at their dogs and my clients know that!  My clients are intelligent people and some may wish to delve deeper into the world of behavioral science but many are happy to stick with the world of click and treat or mark and reward. Naming the reinforcement ‘pyramid’ the Hierarchy of Rewards serves a good purpose in that it makes it more easily understandable for everyone, whether pet industry professional or pet dog guardian.  However, as pet industry professionals, I do believe that we should have a clear understanding of terms such as ‘positive reinforcement’ and recognize that just because we have ‘rewarded’ a dog with a throw of a ball or a tasty treat, that does not necessarily mean we have positively reinforced the behavior.  Only the future will tell us that!

This is the first of a series of three posts from my article:  “The Hierarchy of Rewards – Delving into the World of Positive Reinforcers” for BARKS from the Guild magazine.

This article has also been published as a DogSmith blog and through DogNostics Career Center

Training Meister Journeyman – The Comprehensive Dog Training Course. Presented by Louise Stapleton-Frappell

Presented by Louise Stapleton-Frappell

CEUs PPAB,15. IAABC,15. CCPDT, 10.

TrainingMeister_Journeyman

Training Meister Journeyman Course

A five session programme

to work through over 5 months. 

Training Meister – Mastering Fun and Increasing Your Team Knowledge & Skills is a unique programme aimed at increasing the knowledge and training skills of both dog guardians and pet professionals. The aim of the Training Meister courses is to teach the science behind the training as well as all the skills needed to train a pet dog, with a big emphasis on enjoyment.  We firmly believe that all training should be fun but knowledge based.  We also believe in setting the learner up for success.  This applies both to our human learners and their canine buddies!

Journeyman Course Overview

Journeyman is the Level Two Training Meister course.  This course builds on all the skills and knowledge gained in the Apprentice course. The Journeyman course sees you continue your journey on the road to becoming a Master in the art and craft of force-free training and tricks! 

You will continue to learn about the science behind the training and build on your teaching skills, while having lots of fun!  You will refine your ability to communicate with your learner in order to set them up for success and as you continue to increase your knowledge and add to your skill-set, you will be amazed at the progression made by both you and your dog or other companion animal.

The knowledge and skills you learn in Training Meister Journeyman will set you up for all your future training.  As you practice the behaviors that you learn, your student will acquire new skills, continue to thrive and gain confidence.  Your relationship will further blossom and your bond will strengthen.

You do not need to have taken the Training Meister Apprentice Course, to enroll in the Training Meister Journeyman Course, however, it is advisable to check the learning objectives and assessment criteria from the Apprentice Level to ensure that you have the foundation knowledge for this course.

Programme Inclusion

  • Five recorded webinar e-learning sessions per level.
  • PDF of all webinars
  • Additional learning:  Additional reading material and supplementary videos
  • Homework tasks
  • Open book/multiple choice exams. 
  • Video submission assessment.  .
  • Training Meister Course Facebook group .
  • Video submission assessment to earn the TrickMeister Journeyman Trick Team Title! Please note, you must have earned the Apprentice Title in order to submit your application for the Journeyman Title.

 

The course aims to encourage both guardians and trainers to develop new skills and increase their knowledge while having the best time possible.  You’ll never have more fun learning than when taking this exciting course!

For more information, please visit: http://dognosticselearning.com/Trainingmeister

Journeyman Course Testimonials

“I hope you saw my post thanking you for your help and encouragement. I also want to thank you for being the creator of such a WONDERFUL course. I had taken two other trick titling courses and in comparison, now I feel like I just bought the titles. There was no testing and no education as in your course. I feel your course is the GOLD standard by which I will measure all other training courses!! Thanks again for a wonderful job developing the course and all the hours you must invest in keeping the course running.”  Terri Latronica. Dog Trainer at Boyette Animal Hospital. Florida

“I have really enjoyed the DogNostics TrickMeister Journeyman Course presented by Louise Stapleton-Frappell.  This class goes beyond just showing you how to train a certain trick, but divulges into the science behind the force free training.  The how and why it works so well; how it opens the door to communicate with the learner, thus, setting them up for success.Collie with computer

I have learned a great deal from Louise by her wonderful monthly webinars.  Each month was new tricks and a different aspect of the science behind the teaching of these tricks.  I highly recommend this class to anyone wanting a stronger and more meaningful relationship with their furry companion.  Louise is a wonderful, encouraging person and a very well informed instructor.  You can’t help but to absolutely love her demo dog, Jumbo.  I have enjoyed teaching my dog tricks that I never thought I was capable of doing.  Force free training has opened up a whole new world for me and my dogs.  They love learning and I love to teach.  I am looking forward to the next class and an even deeper understanding of force free training.”  Patti Howerton, Illinois.

“I thoroughly enjoyed the Journeyman course and have learnt so much.  The information here is second to none and needs careful understanding, so all the extra links and opportunity to watch the webinars time again is invaluable.  As an older student it has helped me greatly to watch, read, listen and actually apply what I have learnt in my training and also watch and share progress with the Facebook group.  This has been a lovely way to enrich the relationship I share with my dogs.  Thank you!.”  Lizzie Morris, Devon.

 

Begin your Training Meister journey today!

Estepona Dog Training Expert Brings the World’s Most Progressive Training & Pet Care Methods to our Local Community

To better serve animal lovers of the Costa del Sol, Louise Stapleton-Frappell PCT-A has become a DogSmith Licensed Professional Partner.

ESTEPONA, SpainApril 5, 2017PRLog — DogSmith Services Inc., an international dog training and pet care company, is proud to announce its latest licensed professional partner, The DogSmith of Estepona, serving the Western Costa del Sol. The DogSmith of Estepona is a full-service pet care and dog training business committed to training methods and pet care that are humane and meet explicit ‘force-free’ guidelines.

Louise Stapleton-Frappell, owner and certified dog trainer states, “Being awarded the DogSmith license for the Western Costa del Sol tells our customers that we are members of the upper echelon of highly qualified pet professionals. I believe all training and pet care should be both fun and stress-free and I’m passionate about making sure that guardians and their pets receive the absolute best training and care, along with exceptional customer service, an ethos shared by The DogSmith, an unrivalled Dog Training, Dog Walking & Pet Care Licensing company.”

According to Niki Tudge, DogSmith President, “The DogSmith license is exclusively granted to individuals in the pet industry who possess not just the best in dog training and pet care skills but also possess a high level of customer service and a commitment to ethical business and professional standards. As our latest professional partner, we are very excited to have Louise Stapleton-Frappell working with us. She is an accomplished trainer, educator and pet care provider, who is completely committed to the welfare of her customers’ pets and operates her business as an extension of her personal ‘force-free’ philosophy.”

Read the full press release here: https://www.prlog.org/12631342-estepona-dog-training-expert-brings-the-worlds-most-progressive-training-pet-care-methods-to-our.html

How Pets Learn – Reinforcing The Good Stuff – Part One and Part Two.

A Pet Professional Guild Virtual Summit Recorded Webinar. (One of 25 webinars that were featured in PPG’s August Virtual Pet Care Summit). Presented by Louise Stapleton-Frappellppg-virtual-pc-summit-logo_logo

“Play is essential for healthy brain function and reinforcement is an integral part of the ‘game.’ The reinforcement strategies you use will affect the behaviors being carried out and your canine clients’ desire to engage in them. Struggling to get a dog to walk on a loose leash, to go in a crate or to lie on a bed? Not sure how to aid relaxation and help ensure a dog remains happy and calm while you are putting on a harness or while there is thunder overhead? This presentation will provide you with much of the knowledge and skills you need to set you and your clients (both human and canine) up for success. You will learn how to create an atmosphere that is conducive to your canine clients’ well-being. Happy canines mean happy guardians and happy guardians mean recommendations and an increase in your potential client base. There are lots of positive consequences that result from learning about reinforcing the good stuff. Animals are learning all the time and we need to ensure the learning that takes place is appropriately reinforced – we need to reinforce all of the behaviors we would like to see repeated. This presentation will an overview of operant and respondent conditioning in the context of pet care processes, with a particular focus on positive reinforcement. It will delve into the what, when, where, how and why of reinforcement, take a look at different reinforcement (reward) strategies and how any chosen strategy will enhance or impede daily interactions with canine your clients.”

Webinar Objectives:

Understand the basics of how pets learn.

Learn how your behavior impacts the behavior of pets in your care.

Provide an overview of operant and respondent conditioning.

Learn how to effectively lure a pet into position

Develop a greater understanding of the reinforcement process.

Learn how to choose an appropriate reinforcer to enhance your canine clients’ ability to learn and thrive while in your care.

Gain a deeper understanding of the ‘hierarchy of rewards.’

Understand what we mean when we refer to primary and secondary reinforcers.

Understand how the environment will affect the ‘value’ of your chosen ‘reinforcer.’

Learn how to create a positive association with a head-halter, muzzle, harness, collar or other novel items.

Louise Stapleton-Frappell B.A. HONS. PCT-A. CAP3. CTDI. Dn-FSG.
Louise Stapleton-Frappell B.A. HONS. PCT-A. CAP3. CTDI. Dn-FSG.

About the presenter

Louise Stapleton-Frappell B.A. (Hons), PCT-A, CTDI, FN-FSG1, CAP3 holds a force-free instructor’s award, K9 first aid certification and animal behavior & welfare and dog emotion & cognition verified certification. She previously performed as the Dog Trick instructor at In The Doghouse DTC; is the owner of Happy Dogs Estepona and is an instructor and assessor for the Pet Dog Ambassador program launched this year by the Pet Professional Guild.

Stapleton-Frappell is a passionate advocate of force-free training, promoting a positive image of the “bully” breeds and advocating against Breed Specific Legislation in favor of breed neutral laws and education about dog bite safety and prevention. She is proud “mum” to Jambo – Staffy bull terrier trick dog: the first Staffordshire bull terrier to achieve the title of Trick Dog Champion. Jambo has appeared on Talent Hounds in Canada and was also featured as a Victoria Stilwell Positively Success Story.

Stapleton-Frappell blogs for the Pet Professional Guild and is a regular contributor to BARKS from the Guild magazine. She is a steering committee member of the Pet Professional Guild and membership manager of the Pet Professional Guild British Isles; co-presenter of PPG World Service radio show; faculty member of DogNostics Career College; steering committee member of Doggone Safe and regional coordinator of Doggone Safe in Spain, where she is based.

Stapleton-Frappell believes that everyone should know how to teach their dog using science based, rewards based, force-free training methods and that all learning should be fun. She is the creator of Training Meister, a comprehensive online force-free training program from DogNostics Career College, aimed at increasing the knowledge and skills of pet guardians and professionals.

Register here for Part One: http://www.petprofessionalguild.com/event-2343113

Register here for Part Two: http://www.petprofessionalguild.com/event-2343152

Toads, Snakes, Spiders and Chocolate!

Toads, Snakes, Spiders and Chocolate!  Written for The Pet Professional Guild blog on November 5, 2016 by Louise Stapleton-Frappell

Did you know that an encounter with a toad could have devastating consequences? During a recent class I was teaching, one of the students said that her training buddy and his friends had found a large toad in their yard. They were very fortunate as none of them made actual contact with the toad. Two years ago, I posted a blog, How Force-Free Training Helped Save My Dog’s Life! in which I told the story of my Staffordshire bull terrier, Jambo’s encounter with a toad in the middle of the night and how a combination of previous training, first aid and an immediate visit to the emergency veterinarian all contributed to saving his life. I’m not going to re-visit the story here but I would definitely recommend reading the blog post.
Jambo was fortunate. His training and my first-aid knowledge both contributed to a happy outcome.

Jambo was fortunate. His training and my first-aid knowledge both contributed to a happy outcome

What I would like to do is share some information about toads and a few other creatures, food items, products and objects that could prove deadly to your companion. Let’s start with a few facts about the Common Toad (Bufo Bufo). Toads range in size from 2 – 25 cm (1 – 10 inches). Toads are poisonous when eaten but even mouthing one can prove extremely dangerous. The poison is located in the raised area behind the eyes, known as the parotid gland. Poison is also present in the warts found on the toad’s skin. The toad secretes poison when it feels threatened. Toads are nocturnal creatures, that live on land but breed in water. The toad will often burrow itself underground and remain there for long periods of time, particularly during droughts or very cold weather. They are more likely to be seen at night and in wet weather conditions. There are many different species of toad and, depending on where you live, varied outcomes of coming into close contact with them. The native British toad, Bufus vulgarisis is, for example, much less toxic than some exotic species, such as Bufus blombergi, Bufus alvarius, Bufus marinus.

What are some of the signs that indicate an encounter with a toad? They might vary from less severe local oral effects to inflammation of the mouth and pharynx with excessive salivation and retching, abdominal pain, vomiting, neurological and cardiovascular effects. Contact with exotic toads is more likely to cause the more severe systemic effects and these may be fatal. A dog may show some or all of the following symptoms: Drooling, head shaking, pawing at the mouth and/or whining. There may be a change in the color of the membranes of the mouth. Your dog may attempt to vomit, actively vomit or have diarrhoea. They may experience loss of coordination, an irregular heartbeat and/or difficulty in breathing. They may have convulsions, foam at mouth and/or tightly clamped jaws. The venom can cause rapid heart failure.

Patients that have been treated before enough of the toxin has had a chance to reach the system, within about thirty minutes, usually have a good chance of recovery. However, the overall prognosis is often not good and death is very common in dogs that have been exposed to toad venom. It is vital to get prompt treatment for your dog. Try to be at your veterinary surgery within fifteen minutes as this can make a life-saving difference. Treatment is symptomatic and may vary, dependent on your vet and the severity of the symptoms.

What should you do if you suspect toad poisoning? Contact your emergency vet immediately and follow their advice. While you are doing so, apply immediate first-aid. My advice, reiterated by my own veterinarian, is to rinse out the dog’s mouth with copious amounts of water for at least five minutes. You do NOT want them to swallow it so I suggest the following protocol: Fill a bowl with water; with one hand, hold your dog’s mouth open with head facing downwards; scoop up water from the water bowl with your other hand and rinse out his/her mouth, letting the water come back out onto the floor (not into the bowl). If your dog is having a seizure, please handle with caution as he/she may not recognize you and could unknowingly bite. Keep your pet cool as they can overheat when convulsing. My advice is not intended to replace your veterinarian’s advice, so please act according to their instructions but I do believe that having a knowledge of first-aid procedures can make a huge difference in the way you are likely to react to a potentially fatal situation.

Everyone should have basic first-aid skills. PresenterMedia 1641
Everyone should have basic first-aid skills. PresenterMedia 1641

Please be aware that toad toxin exposure can cause severe irritation to your eyes, nose and throat. If you need to handle the toad, I recommend the use of rubber gloves.

A few more creatures and other items that may be toxic to your dog:
Venomous snakes. Three factors affect the seriousness of a snake bite: 1. The size of the animal bitten. 2. The location of the bite. 3. The type of snake. If your pet is bitten by a snake please seek immediate veterinary attention as they may require antiserum. Try to remember the shape, size and colour of the snake and keep the part of your pet’s body that has been bitten as still as possible to prevent the venom spreading.
Spiders.
Jelly fish.
Scorpions.
Processionary caterpillars.
Chocolate. (The darker, the more toxic)
Onions.
Raisins, grapes, currants and sultanas.
Flowers and plants. Including but not limited to: daffodils, bluebells, crocuses, tulips, ivy, holly, mistletoe and poinsettia. It’s always worth investigating any plants you may have in your garden or plan to purchase.
Oak/acorns and conkers.
Xylitol – an artificial sweetener commonly found in sugar-free chewing gum, sweets, some peanut butter spreads and often used as a sugar substitute in baking.
Ant powders, baits and gels; slug and snail pellets; anticoagulant rodenticides.
Luminous necklaces.
Batteries.
Antifreeze.
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as paracetamol, ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen or aspirin.

This list is by no means exhaustive. If you are in any way concerned that your dog may have been poisoned, had an encounter with anything toxic or venomous, please contact your emergency veterinarian immediately.

What precautions can you take to help protect your canine companion?

1. Use force-free training techniques to teach your dog the following cues:
“Leave it”. Teaching your dog to leave something when you ask him to could save his life. When using food to teach this cue, do not reward with the food you have asked him to leave. Pick the food up off the floor and reward with a higher value food. You do not want your dog to start anticipating that you are going to release him to the very thing you just asked him to leave!
“Come”. Teach your dog a great recall! Never use your recall cue if you don’t think your dog will respond – go and get him instead. Never punish your dog for not coming back to you, as he will be less likely to come back in future.
“Watch Me”. Teaching your dog to focus on you could be all you need to get him to re-orient towards you, rather than the snake, toad or anything else you want him to avoid making contact with.
“Stop!”. Teach your dog an emergency stop. Once you have taught your dog to stop on cue, increase the level of urgency in your voice. Remember, if you use the cue in an emergency you may shout or even scream it. You don’t want your dog to be so frightened of you shouting “stop” that they freeze or run away (perhaps straight into what you are trying to get them to avoid) so a positive conditioned emotional response is crucial.
A rapid response to any of these cues could prevent an encounter that might be extremely dangerous for your dog! If you would like to improve your training knowledge and skills, I highly recommend the DogNostics Training Meister Program. You can register for the first level here.

Training Meister – Increasing your team knowledge and skills
Training Meister – Increasing your team knowledge and skills

2. It can be useful to carry an anti-histamine such as zyrtec or piriton.

3. Enroll on a pet first-aid course. The upcoming Pet Care Technician Certification Program from DogNostics Career College includes a comprehensive pet first-aid section.

4. Always have your veterinarian’s telephone number with you.

5. Try not to panic.

Please note: This advice is not a substitute for a proper consultation with a vet and is only intended as a guide. Please contact your local veterinary practice for advice or treatment immediately if you are worried about your pet’s health – even if they are closed, they will always have an out of hours service available.

HOW PETS LEARN – REINFORCING THE GOOD STUFF – PART ONE

New Recorded webinar: HOW PETS LEARN – REINFORCING THE GOOD STUFF – PART ONE PRESENTED BY LOUISE STAPLETON-FRAPPELL. (One of 25 webinars that were featured in PPG’s August Virtual Pet Care Summit)webinar

Play is essential for healthy brain function and reinforcement is an integral part of the ‘game.’ The reinforcement strategies you use will affect the behaviours being carried out and your canine clients’ desire to engage in them. Struggling to get a dog to walk on a loose leash, to go in a crate or to lie on a bed? Not sure how to aid relaxation and help ensure a dog remains happy and calm while you are putting on a harness or while there is thunder overhead? This presentation will provide you with much of the knowledge and skills you need to set you and your clients (both human and canine) up for success. You will learn how to create an atmosphere that is conducive to your canine clients’ well-being. Happy canines mean happy guardians and happy guardians mean recommendations and an increase in your potential client base. There are lots of positive consequences that result from learning about reinforcing the good stuff. Animals are learning all the time and we need to ensure the learning that takes place is appropriately reinforced – we need to reinforce all of the behaviours we would like to see repeated. This presentation will give an overview of operant and respondent conditioning in the context of pet care processes, with a particular focus on positive reinforcement. It will delve into the what, when, where, how and why of reinforcement, take a look at different reinforcement (reward) strategies and how any chosen strategy will enhance or impede daily interactions with canine your clients.

Webinar Objectives:
Understand the basics of how pets learn.
Learn how your behaviour impacts the behaviour of pets in your care.
Provide an overview of operant and respondent conditioning.
Learn how to effectively lure a pet into position
Develop a greater understanding of the reinforcement process.
Learn how to choose an appropriate reinforcer to enhance your canine clients’ ability to learn and thrive while in your care.
Gain a deeper understanding of the ‘hierarchy of rewards.’
Understand what we mean when we refer to primary and secondary reinforcers.
Understand how the environment will affect the ‘value’ of your chosen ‘reinforcer.’
Learn how to create a positive association with a head-halter, muzzle, harness, collar or other novel items.

More information and online registration: http://www.petprofessionalguild.com/event-2343113

 

Louise Stapleton-Frappell B.A. HONS. PCT-A. CAP3. CTDI. Dn-FSG.
Louise Stapleton-Frappell B.A. HONS. PCT-A. CAP3. CTDI. Dn-FSG.

 

The Right Way To Train!

The Training Meister – Mastering Fun and Increasing Your Team Knowledge & Skills Apprentice Course started on March 1st, 2016 and was shortly followed by the release of the first recorded webinar. Don’t let the name mislead you – Yes, Training Meister teaches lots of fun tricks but it also teaches you how to teach your dog any behaviour you would like them to know!  I’m going to go as far as saying that you will actually learn more on the Training Meister courses than on many dog trainer/instructor courses!

a remember to reinforce

The first webinar’s learning objectives were very detailed:  Learn what equipment is appropriate. Understand the difference between a command and a cue. Understand the “Hierarchy of Rewards” Learn how to choose an appropriate training area. Learn how to choose an appropriate reinforcer. Learn how to use start and release cues to communicate with your learner. Learn how to lure a behaviour and fade the lure for maximum success and minimal stress! Learn when and how to add a visual cue – hand signal. Learn when and how to add a verbal cue. Learn how to “mark” a behaviour with a secondary reinforcer/bridging stimulus that is a verbal marker. Understand how to correctly deliver reinforcement in position and why thoughtless delivery will undermine the reinforcement value. Master the mechanics of training: Handle food rewards safely and efficiently. Deliver food rewards from hand, treat bag, container or pocket; deliver food rewards in a stationary position to dog’s mouth. Clearly demonstrate ability to communicate the cue, mark the behaviour and reinforce the action. Operate a clicker in hand with a non-visual movement. Give a cue without excessive body language or unnecessary repetition. Understand the antecedent package, including direct and distant antecedents and how they will impact on the behaviour being taught. Know the difference between a reward and a reinforcer. Understand the “scientific” meaning of positive reinforcement.  

Training Meister – Increasing your team knowledge and skills

The feedback from all those who enrolled in the course has been fantastic with everyone saying how much fun they are having increasing their skills and expanding their knowledge of how to use rewards based, science based, force-free training, as well as practising all the new behaviours they have learned!

Once each live webinar is aired it is being released as a recording so that everyone can benefit from the knowledge being shared. Whether you are a pet professional or a pet dog guardian, Training Meister will help you enhance your knowledge and build your skills.  Training Meister could even be your path to a new career or give you a great return on your investment when you can offer a great trick training curriculum in your school or business!  You can register for the first webinar by clicking here.  There are several different registration levels so you have the choice of just registering for the recorded webinar or paying slightly more and registering to also have access to the supplementary course information and homework tasks!

According to Dr. Soraya V. Juarbe-Diaz, DVM, DACVB, CAAB, “Using punishment to stop behaviors is not new. Notice I say ‘stop’ rather than ‘teach’ — I can stop any behavior, but I am more interested in teaching my students, animal or human, to choose the behavior I want them to perform because they can trust me, because I do not hurt them and they are safe with me, and because the outcome is something they enjoy. Mistakes are inherent in any type of learning — if I continually frighten or hurt my students when they get something wrong, eventually they will be afraid to try anything new and will not want to learn from me any longer.”  This statement is included in The Pet Professional Guild Call for Change that was written by Niki Tudge and Angelica Steinker in 2012.  You can read the full educational message by clicking here.

Whether you are a pet dog guardian who would like to teach your buddy using kind, safe, effective, science based, rewards based methods that will increase the bond you share, but aren’t really sure where to start, or a trainer who would like to build on the knowledge and skills you already have, look no further –  become a Training Meister!

The Training Meister Programme is packed full of benefits for all who take part by either enrolling in the course or registering for the recorded webinars. Here are just a few of them:

  • Learn all the skills you need to teach a companion animal
  • Increase your understanding of the science behind the training.

  • Learn how to break behaviors down into achievable steps and set your learner up for success.

  • Increase the bond you share with your pet.

  • Increase your knowledge of force-free training.

  • Learn how to make all your training fun.

  • Learn how to incorporate your new found knowledge and skills into every moment you share with your pet or your students

  • Inspires creativity and leads to increased confidence for both pets, guardians and trainers!

Share this post with all your friends.

Let everyone know that there is another way –

The Training Meister Way!

Happy Learning!

Louise Stapleton-Frappell PCT-A

DogNostics Career College

For more information on force-free training and pet care,

or to find your nearest qualified force-free trainer or behaviourist,

please visit The Pet Professional Guild

Learning the TrickMeister Way!

How important is it to teach your canine companion what you would like them to do?

Would you like to go for a walk?
Would you like to go for a walk?

I believe it is extremely important but what is even more essential is that you teach in a way that doesn’t cause any stress; that you teach in a way that is fun for both teacher and student; that you teach in such a way that each ‘lesson’ is easy to understand; that you teach in a way that not only encourages learning but enhances it and that you teach in a way that makes all learning feel like a game!

I also maintain that in order to successfully teach any companion animal, you need to understand animal learning theory – you need a good foundation of the knowledge and skills that underpin science based, rewards based, force-free training!

Whether you are looking to reduce unwanted behaviors or would love your pet to know some cool tricks, the learning process is the same. Whether you are looking for effective management strategies or want to know how to teach your buddy to walk on a loose leash, the philosophy behind all of your interactions with your pet should be the same: A philosophy based on your belief that we do not need to punish our companions in order for them to learn – a philosophy based on the latest scientific research!

I am not implying that you need to be a scientist in order to teach your pet and I’m not implying that you need to study all the latest literature.  I’m not even implying that you need to ‘master’ every single ‘positive’ training strategy that is available for you to use.  I do, however, believe that you should have a foundation of knowledge and skills.

Misinformation abounds about the ‘best’ ways to ‘train’ your dog.  The access to information has never been easier.  Unfortunately, much of the information available isn’t based in fact and worst still, a lot of it could prove extremely detrimental to your pet’s physical and mental well-being and the relationship you share with each other.  You only have to read some of the posts on Facebook, Instagram or any other social media to be inundated with ‘advice’ on how to deal with a specific problem or how to teach a specific behaviour.  Do a search on the internet and you will, without doubt, find the answer you are looking for or will you?  You may think that you have the answer but, if you don’t have at least a basic understanding of learning theory, how will you know that the answer is the right one?

There are many ways to teach a behaviour but not all of them are going to promote a healthy, happy bond for you and your buddy.  Not all of them are going to be in your pet’s best interest.  What appears to be a ‘quick fix’ may be anything but when the consequences of your ‘teaching’ methods resurge at a later date.

Sit?
Would you like to sit?

Let’s take a look at a behaviour that most people are going to teach their pet dog:  a sit.

‘Easy’ you say.  Yes, it’s not difficult to teach but how are you going to teach it?  Are you going to push your companion’s bum to the floor and command them to sit?  Are you going to push their bum to the floor, tell them to sit and then tell them good girl or good boy?  Are you going to pull up on their collar, tell them to sit and then  give them a treat?  Are you going to wait until you see them sitting and then say ‘Yay, good sit!’  Are you going to tell them to sit and then lure them into position with a piece of yummy food?  All of these methods will ‘work’ so which option would you choose?  My choice?  None of the above!  Some are much better methods than the others and I hope you can spot which ones I am referring to, but none of them would be the path I would take.

I would choose the path of modern, science based, rewards based, force-free training.  ‘Mmm’ I hear you say, ‘ a few of the above options  use rewards’.  Yes they do, but none of them are the most effective way to teach your companion how to sit!

So, I hear you ask: ‘How would you teach a sit?’  I would teach it carefully, I would teach it thoughtfully. I would teach it clearly.  I would teach it ‘precisely’.  I would teach it with all future learning in mind.  I would teach it in such a way as to promote accelerated learning.  I wouldn’t just use a ‘reward’, I would use a ‘reinforcer’.  I wouldn’t use a ‘command’ and I wouldn’t even, initially, use a cue!  I would teach it the TrickMeister way!  I would teach it as a trick!  “What?” I hear you say, “Why would you teach it as a trick?  My answer?  I teach all behaviours as tricks and I teach all tricks in a way that fulfills all the above mentioned criteria: Carefully, thoughfully, clearly, precisely…  and much more!

By teaching behaviours as ‘tricks’ I teach in a playful way and in a fun way but this doesn’t mean that I didn’t need to learn the mechanics; it doesn’t mean that I didn’t need to understand ‘learning theory’; it doesn’t mean that I didn’t need to know the difference between a ‘command’ and a ‘cue’ or the difference between a ‘reward’ and a ‘reinforcer’.  I had to work on my skill-set and I had to build on my knowledge.  I needed to learn how to ‘cleanly’ lure a behaviour.  I needed to learn about fading the lure.  I needed to learn about ‘marking’ a desired behaviour.  I needed to learn how to break my ‘lessons’ down into easily achievable steps.  I needed to learn about training in ‘sets’.  I needed to learn when I should add the cue…

I’ll let you into a secret – I’m still learning!  I love to learn and my dogs love to learn!  My students love to learn and their dogs love to learn!  Why?  Because learning is fun!  Learning is a game!  Every interaction we have is a chance to learn!   I will never stop learning!

If you are a pet dog owner who is interested in learning how to teach your pet or you are a trainer who would like to improve your skills and knowledge and perhaps introduce a ‘trick’ or even a new ‘manners’ programme to your training curriculum then please take a look at the TrickMeister programme.  The money you spend now will put you on the right path for all your future learning and could even increase your business’s future revenue.

For more information, please go to:  DogNostics eLearning.

 

Louise Stapleton-Frappell B.A. HONS. PCT-A. CAP3. CTDI. Dn-FSG.
Louise Stapleton-Frappell B.A. HONS. PCT-A. CAP3. CTDI. Dn-FSG.

Louise Stapleton-Frappell B.A. Hons. (Univ. of Leeds). Professional Canine Trainer – Accredited through The Pet Professional Accreditation Board. Certified Trick Dog Instructor. Fun Scent Games Instructor. Clicker Competency Assessment Program Level 3 Distinction. Force-Free Instructor’s Award and K9 First Aid Certification. Animal Behavior and Welfare Verified Certification. Super Trainer Clicker Trainer. Dog Emotion and Cognition Verified Certification. Performed as the Dog Trick Instructor at In The Doghouse DTC.

Louise is a passionate advocate of Force-Free Training, promoting a positive image of the “Bully” Breeds and advocating against Breed Specific Legislation in favor of breed neutral laws and education about dog bite safety and prevention. Proud “Mum” to Jambo – Staffy Bull Terrier Trick Dog:  The first Staffordshire Bull Terrier to achieve the Title of Trick Dog Champion. Louise has her own YouTube Channel where she shares “How to Teach” videos and fun trick videos. Jambo has been aired on “Talent Hounds” TV in Canada. Jambo was also featured as a Victoria Stilwell “Positively Success Story”.

Louise blogs for The Pet Professional Guild and is a regular contributor to BARKS from the Guild magazine.  She is a Steering Committee Member of PPG; Steering Committee Member and the Membership Manager of the Pet Professional Guild British Isles; Co-presenter of PPG World Services radio; Faculty Member of DogNostics Career College; Steering Committee Member of Doggone Safe and Regional Coordinator of Doggone Safe in Spain. Louise is a passionate advocate of Force-Free Training. She believes that everyone should know how to teach their dog using science based, rewards based, force-free training methods and that all learning should be fun!  Louise is also the creator of TrickMeister, a  unique program aimed at increasing the knowledge and training skills of both dog guardians and pet professionals.

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